Low levels of unfriendly E. coli are actually a good thing! They help train your baby’s immune system. Just don’t let it dominate your baby’s gut.
Low levels of
unfriendly E. coli are actually a good thing! They help train your baby’s immune system. Just don’t let it dominate your baby’s gut.

There are 38 trillion reasons to care about your baby's microbiome.

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What is a microbiome?

Your microbiome is a community of 38 trillion tiny microbes that play an essential role in your immune development and overall health.

“If you upset this process in early life then we may have consequences later and that can lead to production of disease later in life.”

Rodney Dietert, PhD
Professor Emeritus of Microbiology
& Immunology, Cornell University

Why is it important?

of children in the US have at least one chronic health condition, and that number keeps growing

“Imagine a world where you will take your baby to a health care check. They will routinely monitor the gut microbiome development....

If any disruptions are noted, a tailor-made product to restore the gut microbiota will be prescribed. The onset of any chronic diseases will be extremely rare.”

Dr. Henna Maria Uusitupa
Microbiome Researcher, TED Speaker (2.5M views)

The first 1,000 days is when you have the biggest impact on your baby’s gut and lifelong health.

For the best immune health, it's ideal for your baby to have 30-80% bifidobacteria.

More than a microbiome test

Actionable

Through trimesters and milestones during your baby’s 1,000 days, we get you there.

Personalized

We offer medically reviewed guides that are dialed into your unique test results.

Evidence-based

We’re geeky and we embrace it. Our team distills the latest science so that you don’t have to.

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Don't just take our word for it.

Check out these key research papers to learn more about the intricacies of microbiome health.

Early infancy microbial and metabolic alterations affect risk of childhood asthma.

Researchers found that there are four key bacteria that, if present at 3 months of age, drastically reduce the risk of developing asthma, suggesting a protective effect.

Type 1 & Type 2 Diabetes
Allergies & Eczema

Neonatal gut microbiota associates with childhood multisensitized atopy and T cell differentiation.

In this study, researchers found that the newborn gut microbiome directly impacts the developing immune system. A dysbiotic newborn gut microbiota, characterized by the depletion of beneficial Bifidobacteria, Lactobacillus, Faecalibacterium, and Akkermansia, led to a dysfunction in T cell populations, influencing the susceptibility to childhood allergic asthma.

General Studies

Intestinal microbiota in infants and high risk of allergy: Effect of Probiotics and Eczema development.

Hydrolyzed protein formula - with additional prebiotics - has the potential to change the gut microbiome of babies who are at a high risk of developing allergies. The addition of prebiotics to formula supported the development of a baby’s microbiome, helping it to resemble the gut of a breastfed baby and potentially protecting against the development of allergies later in life.

General Studies

Temporal development of the gut microbiome in early childhood from the TEDDY study.

Using stool samples from the Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study, one of the largest datasets on the infant microbiome scientists concluded that during the developmental stage (3-14 months), breastfeeding was the most significant factor associated with microbiome composition, with higher levels of healthy Bifidobacterium bacteria. Microbiome diversity increased after weaning as the infants consumed a greater variety of foods.

Type 1 & Type 2 Diabetes

The human gut microbiome in early-onset type 1 diabetes from the TEDDY study.

In this study, nearly 11,000 stool samples from 783 children were analyzed to try to understand how early gut microbiome can impact Type 1 diabetes. Researchers found that infants without Type 1 diabetes have more microbial genes related to fermentation and production of short-chain fatty acids, which are beneficial to gut health and immune function.

Type 1 & Type 2 Diabetes

Roles of Birth Mode & Infant Gut Microbiota in Intergenerational Transmission of Overweight & Obesity From Mother to Offspring.

In this cohort study of 935 mother-infant pairs, infants born to mothers with overweight or obesity were more likely to be overweight at ages 1 and 3 years compared to infants born to mothers with normal weight. In addition, infants delivered by c-section had double the odds for developing childhood overweight or obesity compared to infants delivered vaginally.

Obesity

Infants born to mothers with IBD present with altered gut microbiome that transfers abnormalities of the adaptive immune system to germ-free mice.

Babies born to mothers with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) present an unhealthy bacterial gut composition up to at least 3 months of life, characterized by the absence of healthy Bifidobacteria. This unhealthy microbiome led to important changes in the adaptive immune system of the gut in germ-free mice, highlighting the importance of a microbiome-based intervention during early infancy, thus reducing the risk of developing IBD.

Obesity
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Low levels of unfriendly E. coli are actually a good thing! They help train your baby’s immune system. Just don’t let it dominate your baby’s gut.
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For the best immune health, it's ideal for your baby to have 30-80% bifidobacteria.
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