Your baby's
gut health
starts with you.

The first microbiome tests for the whole family:
from preconception to toddlerhood.
Take the quiz

The first 1,000 days set up your baby’s health for life.

Your baby inherits your microbiome at birth
Which microbes they first come into contact with matters
If you detect any imbalances early on, you can take action to reduce health risks

80% of your immune system is in your gut. Take control of your family’s gut health.

Measure

We send you an at-home vaginal and/or stool test kit. Sampling takes 5-10 minutes.

Note from Tiny Health

You have been breastfeeding and giving your baby a probiotic. Your baby’s gut at 6m looks great!

Learn

Our CLIA-certified lab uses next-gen  sequencing to analyze your microbiome.

Improve

Start taking action with personalized
recommendations based on your results.

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“I started Tiny Health to bring the latest microbiome science to parents immediately, so that they can take action when it matters most. Not 10 years later.”

Cheryl, Founder of Tiny Health
Read our full story

See the impact of Tiny Health’s insights to these families

Tiny Health demonstrates the magic of breastmilk.

Thanks to breastmilk, and the special sugars found in breastmilk known as HMOs, the beneficial bacteria in Daniel’s gut flourished. 

Read case studies

Developed with experts in early-life microbiome health

Ruben Mars, PhD
Founding Advisor

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Center for Individualized Medicine Microbiome Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Nicole Calloway Rankins, MD, MPH
Medical Advisor

Medical Advisor; Practicing OB/GYN Hospitalist Physician, Creator and Host of The All About Pregnancy & Birth Podcast

Dr. Kim Green, MD
Medical Advisor

Associate Clinical Professor, UCSF; Pediatrician and former Chief Innovation Officer, Kaiser Permanente

Noel Mueller, PhD
Scientific Advisor

Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University

Rodney Dietert, PhD
Scientific Advisor

Professor Emeritus of Microbiology & Immunology, Cornell University

Joel Warsh, MD
Medical Advisor

Board-Certified Pediatrician, Creator of Raising Amazing Podcast

Meghan Azad, PhD
Scientific Advisor

Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Child Health at the University of Manitoba; Co-Director, Manitoba Interdisciplinary Lactation Center (MILC); Deputy Director, CHILD Cohort Study

See all advisors
Taylor K. Soderborg, MD, PhD

Taylor K. Soderborg, MD, PhD. Tiny Health Medical Director

Ruben Mars, PhD
Founding Advisor

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Center for Individualized Medicine Microbiome Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Nicole Calloway Rankins, MD, MPH
Medical Advisor

Medical Advisor; Practicing OB/GYN Hospitalist Physician, Creator and Host of The All About Pregnancy & Birth Podcast

Dr. Kim Green, MD
Medical Advisor

Associate Clinical Professor, UCSF; Pediatrician and former Chief Innovation Officer, Kaiser Permanente

Noel Mueller, PhD
Scientific Advisor

Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University

Rodney Dietert, PhD
Scientific Advisor

Professor Emeritus of Microbiology & Immunology, Cornell University

See all advisors
“I would 100% recommend this to anyone who is pregnant. I was blown away by how actionable the report was, and it was very reassuring to see those positive changes in my baby’s gut early on.”
~ Ashley B.
“We were very impressed at how many insights we received in our reports and enjoyed learning about our whole family’s gut microbes. Our pediatrician was comfortable with some suggested actions and our baby’s symptoms went away after.”
~ Vijay D.
“After taking Tiny Health’s vaginal and gut tests and being more aware of early-life microbiome health, I decided to attempt a VBAC instead of a planned c-section, and seeing the results encouraged me to continue exclusively breastfeeding my baby.”
~ Marta N.

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FAQs

What is a microbiome test? Is it the same as a genetics test?

A genetic test uses a saliva or blood sample which contains human cells and maps your own DNA.

In contrast, a microbiome test reads the DNA of your microorganisms! For this you can take a sample from a specific area of the body, like stool or a vaginal swab. Then, we analyze which microbes are present.

The microbes found can tell us about your overall health, risks during pregnancy, and how to best support your baby’s metabolic, immune, and brain development.

While human genetics are powerful, it cannot tell us everything!

Your genes interact with the environment along with the microbiome. It’s like a 3 way interaction that determines health. Because the environment is so important for disease, scientists now realize that the microbiome is more predictive for many diseases than human genetics.

You inherit your genes from your parents at conception, but after that, there’s no changing them. A genetic test will tell you the same thing when you’re 1, 20, and 80 years-old. While the microbes in your gut can and do change! At birth you inherit your microbes from your mom, but you’ll pick up lots of others, especially during the first few years of life. And how they change depends on how you interact with your family, pets, and the environment.

Microbiome testing is an exciting  tool for monitoring mom and baby’s health and gives insight into optimal microbial transfer during baby’s development.

Why are a baby’s first 1,000 days so crucial for their lifelong health?

During the first 1,000 days of a baby’s life - 9 months of pregnancy and a baby’s first two years - an incredible amount of development takes place, which includes immune system training through the microbiome. 

This immune training - especially programmed in the first 3-6 months of life - contributes to a child’s lifelong health and has been directly linked to a wide range of metabolic and immune-mediated chronic disease.

Eczema, allergies, asthma, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and obesity have all been strongly linked to a suboptimal baby microbiome. Weaker associations include those for ADHD, autism, and other autoimmune conditions.

The good news is that during a baby’s first 1,000 days, you have the opportunity to strongly affect a baby’s microbiome. Like through simple lifestyle shifts or changes in diet. We’re here to help make that positive change happen!

What can Tiny Health’s reports tell me?

Our reports provide an overview of your gut and/or vaginal microbiome, including information about beneficial bacteria, inflammation, and disease associations such as the chance of infection, preterm birth, and bacterial vaginosis.

A mom’s health impacts the health of a baby. So, we offer suggestions on how to improve the microbiome health during pregnancy, such as dietary interventions, lifestyle changes, and probiotic supplementation. We also talk about how to protect against future health problems in a baby.

We are very interested in looking at a baby's stool sample 7-day after birth, because the first microbes that colonize the baby’s gut will leave an immune imprint that will last a long time. This early sample will give time to positively change the gut microbiome. 

The 3-month and 12-month samples can shed some light on whether a baby has biomarkers associated with eczema, allergies, and asthma. The 6-month sample can explain how a change in diet may impact a baby’s microbiome. For example, how breastmilk, formula, or solids change the microbiome. 

For a toddler 1 year old and up, we track gut microbiome maturation and diversity, the capacity to produce butyrate, and inflammatory markers.

Our research-backed reports include actionable recommendations customized according to your unique health history, microbiome composition, symptoms, and experiences.

When should I test or resample myself or my child?

The timing of your Tiny Health test matters. If you’re pregnant, we recommend that you test as early as possible. Preferably, in the first trimester so that you can take action where needed and perhaps again in the third trimester of your pregnancy to track if there’s been a positive change. If your vaginal sample returns a CST4 result, you may want to try and resample to see if your CST has changed. But any time during pregnancy is a good time to test.

You are welcome to submit your child’s samples at any time point. The best way to track a baby’s gut health is with a series of tests, because the baby’s microbiome changes very rapidly in the first few years.

The earlier you test, the more impact a potential intervention may have for their lifelong health. Because of this, we strongly encourage you to submit your baby’s first sample as soon as possible and not wait.

From a scientific point of view, the 7-day post birth sample is the most important one. The pioneering microbes that colonize a baby’s gut may leave an immune imprint important for their long-term development. And it will give enough time to improve the microbiome when necessary.

The 3-month and 12-month samples may shed some light on whether a baby has biomarkers associated with eczema, allergies and asthma. The 6-month sample may show how changes in diet (such as breastmilk, formula, solids) impact a baby’s microbiome.

For a toddler 1 year old and up, we track other important biomarkers for overall gut health such as gut microbiome maturation, microbiome diversity, butyrate production capacity, and inflammation markers.

We also encourage you to resample whenever there’s a big change in your or your baby’s feeding patterns, use of medications like antibiotics, a new medical diagnosis, new symptoms (like allergies, eczema, bloody stool), or a change in behavior (such as digestive complaints or sleep issues).

How are Tiny Health’s microbiome tests different from other microbiome tests?

Unlike other commercial microbiome services, Tiny Health currently offers the first and only direct-to-consumer microbiome test with analytic services tailored to babies. 

We are the first microbiome test that is specifically designed for families; especially during pregnancy and infancy! We also use state-of-the-art technology from academia to provide detailed insights.

Our recommendations are specific to the health needs of expectant and pregnant women, women who are trying to conceive and young children, and children from newborn onwards. Our shotgun metagenomics sequencing offers more comprehensive, in-depth microbiome data compared to that obtained with 16S-based options (see The Technology section of FAQs).

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